CENTER NEWS
Events, Stories & Announcements
STORY May 19, 2017 | 2:11 PM

Monique Williams Jordan

Andrew

Published: July 25, 2017 | 2:22 PM

Andrew grew up wanting to be a sailor in the United States Navy. When the traditional school system wasn't able to accommodate his needs, he thought his childhood dreams would never become a reality. So when he heard about the Job Corps program and the opportunity to get his GED along with 675 trade hours that would enable him to qualify to enlist with the Navy, he couldn't wait to sign up.

When Andy came to Iroquois Job Corps Center, he immediately began working on obtaining his GED and his Brick Masonry certificate. He also worked closely with the U.S. Navy recruiting officer. As part of the recruitment process, Andy was required to leave the center each week and participate in the Delayed Entry Program of the Navy. Andy told everyone who would listen what a great opportunity the Navy was and actually recruited four others to enlist as Sailors.

Andy took his GED exam and passed it. He was on his way! Then Andy completed the requirements of the Brick Masonry trade and had enough hours to enlist. There was only one problem: he was born in another country and couldn't locate his original birth certificate.

Andy worked with center staff to obtain the documentation he needed, and finally, his dream came true. He was off to Boot Camp. Since he had recruited four others to enlist, he went in as an E-1. Andy joined the U.S. Navy and is now another Iroquois Job Corps success story who is proudly serving his country!

Read More

Brittany

Published: July 25, 2017 | 2:26 PM

Brittany came to Iroquois Job Corps Center when she was just 17 years old. She was a very polite and respectful young lady. Because of her age, Brittany had to wait six months to take the GED exam. Since she wasn't sure what career technical training she was interested in taking, she explored Carpentry, Medical Office Support, and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) before deciding she wanted to pursue something in the medical field.

Brittany decided to take CNA as it fit well with her long term goals of becoming a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Brittany entered the CNA training program and worked very hard to achieve her New York State certification. She excelled at her clinicals and was well liked by all her patients.

It was now time to prepare for the GED exam. She was always on time to class and was very determined to do her best. Brittany received many positives for volunteering for extra duties. She took the GED exam and passed!

Brittany then signed up for Work-Based Learning (WBL) as it was her desire to relocate to the Medina, New York, area. She started work as a CNA and began to prepare for her transition to independent living. She then saved enough money to get her own apartment when she left Iroquois Job Corps.

During a recent employment evaluation, Brittany's employer had nothing but kudos for her performance. They said Brittany has perfect attendance, a wonderful attitude, and a great work ethic.

Read More

Gettis Garcia

Published: March 21, 2013 | 2:15 PM

The student employees at the Iroquois Job Corps Center enter the program with goals of obtaining one of the "3E"s – employment, enlistment in the military, or enrollment in further education. For one of our student employees, her goal of obtaining employment came to fruition before she even left our center.

Gettis Garcia set goals early in the program to obtain a high school diploma and to obtain a certification as a nursing assistant. She not only completed her initial goals but took it further with additional career technical training and leadership responsibilities. Gettis enhanced her career skills by obtaining certifications in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillator(AED), electrocardiogram (EKG), and customer service. She completed advanced leadership classes and held positions in the dormitory and in the Student Government Association. With her skills and attributes, it was easy to say that Gettis was going places.

Gettis applied to work while enrolled at the Iroquois Job Corps Center through the center's Work-Based Learning (WBL) program. Gettis obtained full-time employment as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). Gettis loved her role as a CNA caring for the residents and building relationships. She talked very highly of the teamwork atmosphere and her supportive supervisors.

Her supervisor said, "Gettis came as a new CNA. I remember Gettis, on the first day of orientation, so attentive, asking questions, and truly determined to become a good employee. Gettis completed her orientation period, and all of her reports from her mentor and unit nurse were excellent. Gettis is always on time to work and has a terrific attitude with the residents. She truly comes to work ready to assist our residents with their daily needs. Gettis shows a positive attitude and a willingness to learn more about her position as a CNA and has proven to be an asset."

Gettis' success can be attributed to her determination and hard work to obtain her goals.

Read More

Judge Sergio A. Gutierrez

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:12 PMSTORIES

Job Corps' motto is "Success Lasts a Lifetime" and nowhere is this more evident than in the story of Idaho Court of Appeals Chief Judge Sergio Gutierrez, who received his GED and studied carpentry at the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in the early 1970s.

Born in Chihuahua, Mexico, Sergio crossed the border with his family and settled in Stockton, California. His father struggled to make ends meet for his six children on field workers’ wages and his mother suffered from crippling mental illness. To ease their burden, Sergio, then four years old, and one of his sisters moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico, to live with their loving grandmother in a leaky, hole-covered house that he remembers as barely habitable. Despite this poverty and hardship, Sergio was inspired by his grandmother’s wisdom and promised her that he would make something of himself.

When Gutierrez was 12, his beloved grandmother died, and he moved back to Stockton with his mother, his farm worker stepfather, and 12 other siblings. Scraping by in these conditions proved to be too much for the young man. He dropped out of high school after finishing 9th grade and fell in with a crowd of older boys that he admits were hoodlums.

Often homeless and frustrated with barely getting by on menial jobs, Sergio went to an employment office where he met a woman who recommended the Job Corps program to him. Resolving to fulfill his promise to his grandmother, he enrolled that day. This was when his new life began.

At 16, Sergio began attending the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in Oregon. The structure, support, and serenity of the center "gave me an affirmation that I could do something with my life." Sergio quickly became a leader among the students and graduated with carpentry skills and a GED.

Transformed by his experiences at Wolf Creek, Sergio went on to earn both an undergraduate and a law degree, practiced law, and was appointed to the Idaho Court of Appeals in 2002.

Judge Gutierrez attributes his success to the Job Corps program. "I was not going down the right path, and the program literally saved my life," he said. “My life turned around when I enrolled in the Wolf Creek Job Corp Center in Glide, Oregon. Job Corps saved my life. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from Boise State University and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings Law School. But I am most proud of the GED that I attained at Wolf Creek because it represented a new start in my life.”

Read More

Troy Carter

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:09 PMSTORIES

Like many Job Corps graduates, Troy Carter began his life in a low-income neighborhood with nothing but a dream of music industry success and a drive to make it happen. After struggling to balance his education with a budding music career, Carter enrolled in the former Chesapeake Job Corps Center in Port Deposit, Maryland in 1990.

Carter quickly graduated from Job Corps with a GED. Saying the program "helped me experience independence for the first time,” Carter applied his new skills and perspective with renewed focus to his music industry ambitions.

Today he is the CEO of Coalition Media Group, a successful Beverly Hills, California, artist management and digital marketing company. He has worked closely with superstars like Sean "Diddy" Combs, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Will Smith, Eve, Nelly, and Lady Gaga.

Carter says America needs institutions like Job Corps because building leaders "starts in school" with students who "don’t stop dreaming and work hard.” He is living proof that, if just given the opportunity, tomorrow’s leader could be anyone, even an ambitious young dreamer from West Philadelphia.

Read More

Monique Williams Jordan

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:11 PMSTORIES

With a pinch of passion, a sprinkle of creativity and a generous amount of determination, "Chef Moe," Monique Williams, has turned her culinary aspirations into a recipe for success.

Her journey began as a culinary arts student at Woodstock Job Corps Center in Maryland - the same school where she landed her first job. After several years of teaching and inspiring other young chefs, Williams became the first former Job Corps student to become an advanced instructor at Anne Arundel Community College’s hands-on culinary program.

Chef Moe was recognized during the 45th Anniversary of Job Corps celebration and later joined her Woodland Job Corps Center culinary students to cook with Chef Robert Irvine from the Food Network show Dinner: Impossible. "The opportunity to make a life-changing difference in the lives of other young people is very special to me, and I will forever be grateful to Job Corps for giving me that," said Williams.

Chef Moe’s work in the kitchen is truly inspired, but it’s her gift for inspiring others to achieve independence and success, no matter where they come from, that has the power to change the world. We can’t wait to see what she cooks up next.

Read More

Monique Williams Jordan

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:11 PMSTORIES

With a pinch of passion, a sprinkle of creativity and a generous amount of determination, "Chef Moe," Monique Williams, has turned her culinary aspirations into a recipe for success.

Her journey began as a culinary arts student at Woodstock Job Corps Center in Maryland - the same school where she landed her first job. After several years of teaching and inspiring other young chefs, Williams became the first former Job Corps student to become an advanced instructor at Anne Arundel Community College’s hands-on culinary program.

Chef Moe was recognized during the 45th Anniversary of Job Corps celebration and later joined her Woodland Job Corps Center culinary students to cook with Chef Robert Irvine from the Food Network show Dinner: Impossible. "The opportunity to make a life-changing difference in the lives of other young people is very special to me, and I will forever be grateful to Job Corps for giving me that," said Williams.

Chef Moe’s work in the kitchen is truly inspired, but it’s her gift for inspiring others to achieve independence and success, no matter where they come from, that has the power to change the world. We can’t wait to see what she cooks up next.

Read More

Troy Carter

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:09 PMSTORIES

Like many Job Corps graduates, Troy Carter began his life in a low-income neighborhood with nothing but a dream of music industry success and a drive to make it happen. After struggling to balance his education with a budding music career, Carter enrolled in the former Chesapeake Job Corps Center in Port Deposit, Maryland in 1990.

Carter quickly graduated from Job Corps with a GED. Saying the program "helped me experience independence for the first time,” Carter applied his new skills and perspective with renewed focus to his music industry ambitions.

Today he is the CEO of Coalition Media Group, a successful Beverly Hills, California, artist management and digital marketing company. He has worked closely with superstars like Sean "Diddy" Combs, DJ Jazzy Jeff, Will Smith, Eve, Nelly, and Lady Gaga.

Carter says America needs institutions like Job Corps because building leaders "starts in school" with students who "don’t stop dreaming and work hard.” He is living proof that, if just given the opportunity, tomorrow’s leader could be anyone, even an ambitious young dreamer from West Philadelphia.

Read More

Judge Sergio A. Gutierrez

Published: May 19, 2017 | 2:12 PMSTORIES

Job Corps' motto is "Success Lasts a Lifetime" and nowhere is this more evident than in the story of Idaho Court of Appeals Chief Judge Sergio Gutierrez, who received his GED and studied carpentry at the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in the early 1970s.

Born in Chihuahua, Mexico, Sergio crossed the border with his family and settled in Stockton, California. His father struggled to make ends meet for his six children on field workers’ wages and his mother suffered from crippling mental illness. To ease their burden, Sergio, then four years old, and one of his sisters moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico, to live with their loving grandmother in a leaky, hole-covered house that he remembers as barely habitable. Despite this poverty and hardship, Sergio was inspired by his grandmother’s wisdom and promised her that he would make something of himself.

When Gutierrez was 12, his beloved grandmother died, and he moved back to Stockton with his mother, his farm worker stepfather, and 12 other siblings. Scraping by in these conditions proved to be too much for the young man. He dropped out of high school after finishing 9th grade and fell in with a crowd of older boys that he admits were hoodlums.

Often homeless and frustrated with barely getting by on menial jobs, Sergio went to an employment office where he met a woman who recommended the Job Corps program to him. Resolving to fulfill his promise to his grandmother, he enrolled that day. This was when his new life began.

At 16, Sergio began attending the Wolf Creek Job Corps Center in Oregon. The structure, support, and serenity of the center "gave me an affirmation that I could do something with my life." Sergio quickly became a leader among the students and graduated with carpentry skills and a GED.

Transformed by his experiences at Wolf Creek, Sergio went on to earn both an undergraduate and a law degree, practiced law, and was appointed to the Idaho Court of Appeals in 2002.

Judge Gutierrez attributes his success to the Job Corps program. "I was not going down the right path, and the program literally saved my life," he said. “My life turned around when I enrolled in the Wolf Creek Job Corp Center in Glide, Oregon. Job Corps saved my life. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from Boise State University and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings Law School. But I am most proud of the GED that I attained at Wolf Creek because it represented a new start in my life.”

Read More